UICOMP ranked 11th nationwide

 

University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria

  
   
Report ranks UICOMP 11th in nation for producing primary care physicians

 

The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria was named among the top 15 producers of primary care graduates across the U.S., according to a new study in the medical journal, Academic Medicine. 

UICOMP ranked No. 11 of 161 U.S. institutions sponsoring graduate medical education with more than 200 residency graduates between 2006-2008, according to the report that will appear in the September issue of Academic Medicine. Rankings were based on the rate of residency graduates who entered primary care compared to total number of residency graduates.

 

“What this says is that we are providing accountable health care education, and the quality of education being provided by the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria is commensurate with societal needs, which is ever so important,” Thomas Santoro, MD, UICOMP’s Associate Dean of Graduate Medical Education, said of the study. “Not only are we providing the type of care that’s needed – the primary care physician – but also where they’re needed geographically. We’re fulfilling our mission and doing what the College of Medicine in Peoria was created to do.”

   
      

To read the report in full (Rankings list by rate is found on Page 9): “Toward Graduate Medical Education (GME) Accountability: Measuring the Outcomes of GME Institutions

   
 

UICOMP had 201 residency graduates between 2006 and 2008 – the years the study focused on to allow graduates time to become established in practice – with 78 of those graduates, or 38.8 percent, entering primary care, the report cited. Two other Illinois institutions also were among the top 15, including Southern Illinois University School of Medicine in Springfield.

 

While the federal government provides nearly $10 billion annually in subsidies toward graduate medical education, “the physician workforce is struggling to meet the nation’s health care needs, particularly in primary care and geographically underserved areas,” the study noted. The research study provides a method for looking at institutional outcomes in terms of primary care.

 

In 2008, the Association of American Medical Colleges projected a shortage of 124,000 full-time equivalent physicians by 2025, with primary care accounting for the largest share (37 percent or 46,000 full-time equivalents).

 

Similarly, a 2012 article in the Annals of Family Medicine cites 52,000 primary care physicians will be needed by 2025 to meet demand, driven largely by population growth and aging.

 

A look at the top 15 producers of primary care by rate according to the study in Academic Medicine:

 

 

No.

Top producers of primary care graduates

Location

Total No. of grads

No. of specialties trained

No. in primary care

% in primary care

1.

University of Nevada School of Medicine

Reno, Nev.

239

11

129

54

2.

Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center

Bronx, NY

286

12

143

50

3.

Kaiser Permanente Southern California

Los Angeles, Calif.

286

16

140

49

4.

Brooklyn Hospital Center

Brooklyn, NY

227

9

109

48

5.

James H. Quillen College of Medicine

Johnson City, Tenn.

240

12

113

47.1

6.

University of Kansas School of Medicine (Wichita)

Wichita, Kan.

233

11

108

46.4

7.

Atlantic Health

Florham Park, NJ

244

10

110

45.1

8.

UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program

Fresno, Calif.

206

9

86

41.8

9.

Advocate Lutheran General Hospital

Park Ridge, Ill.

205

11

85

41.5

10.

Kaiser Permanente Medical Group

Oakland, Calif.

227

4

94

41.4

11.

University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria

Peoria, Ill.

201

13

78

38.8

12.

New York Methodist Hospital

Brooklyn, NY

256

14

98

38.3

13.

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

Springfield, Ill.

268

22

98

36.6

14.

Long Island College Hospital

Brooklyn, NY

203

7

72

35.5

15.

Wright State University School of Medicine

Dayton, Ohio

340

18

120

35.3

 

 

UICOMP sponsors 11 residency and nine fellowship training programs in collaboration with its two primary affiliates, OSF Saint Francis Medical Center and UnityPoint Health – Methodist.

Santoro says the report provides documentation of accountability, but he adds some caution.

 

“We’ve never had any level of accountability, so this is a look at what the return on investment is in the physician workforce,” he said. “It’s been proven time and again that effective medical therapy requires a director, an orchestra leader and that’s what the primary care physician provides. However, from this perspective, you might think places like Duke or Harvard (ranked among the bottom) could be in trouble, which is not the case at all. If you ask the question ‘how many graduates go on to be physicians of academic excellence,’ they would be the ones producing the researchers of the future, making the biomedical discoveries and producing the faculty members of excellence. Their orientation is just different.”

 

One of four campuses that make up one of the largest public medical schools in the United States, the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria educates more than 150 medical students annually and more than 250 residents and fellows.